Mountain Biking 2017!

Discussion in 'Cycling: Mountain, Road, Uni' started by coskigirl, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Johnny V.

    Johnny V. Getting on the lift Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    181
    Location:
    Finger Lakes/Rochester NY
    First real mountain biking of the year today..........conditions were much dryer than I expected in my favorite local park considering the rain we had Thursday and Friday. I did crash on a muddy downhill and ended up with some good bruises, but it felt great to be out and working up a sweat.
     
    Ron and AmyPJ like this.
  2. Jersey Skier

    Jersey Skier aka RatherPlayThanWork or Gary Skier

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Posts:
    229
    Location:
    Metuchen, NJ
    Trails are all too wet this weekend.

    IMG_4606.JPG
     
    Ron and Superbman like this.
  3. rj2

    rj2 Still using the same poles from the 70s Skier

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Posts:
    26
    Anyone going to the Sea Otter Classic?
     
  4. AmyPJ

    AmyPJ Let's go! Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    2,596
    Location:
    Ogden, UT
    We just received 18 inches of snow, so...I'm skiing.
    The Wasatch front trails I believe remain rideable. I can't even imagine when the backside trails will be ready. 418 inches of snowfall at Snowbasin this winter is going to take awhile to melt...
     
  5. Ron

    Ron AKA Finndog Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Posts:
    3,240
    Location:
    Steamboat Springs, Co
    Watching this thread for stoke. In the mean time, my Cannondale FSI is in the shop getting setup. If there are any CDale experts out there, We are trying to figure out how to reposition the battery on the Di2. I ordered a dropper and the bike came with the battery spec'd to go in the seat tube. I am trying to see if it can be located in the head tube or internally by the cranks. Worse option is at the lower bottle cage.

    Any ideas? Cant wait to ride and climb on this machine. Also, I am putting 2.25 RR's on it was considering going wider but didn't want to start adding weight since its sitting at 21# now. And, no I didn't pay anything close to the list price :)

    http://www.cannondale.com/USA/Bike/...parentid=52698ce3-52fd-481c-a00c-54950ddc0349

    [​IMG]
     
    AmyPJ likes this.


  6. Jersey Skier

    Jersey Skier aka RatherPlayThanWork or Gary Skier

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Posts:
    229
    Location:
    Metuchen, NJ
    Haven't tried this myself, but there is plenty of room in the headtube. http://bikeandskiblog.com/wp/2015/12/06/shimano-xtr-di2-installing-the-battery-in-the-fork-steerer/
     
    Ron likes this.
  7. Ron

    Ron AKA Finndog Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Posts:
    3,240
    Location:
    Steamboat Springs, Co
    Thanks! Need to see how far down that extends.
     
  8. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    6,759
    Location:
    Colorado
    Sunday was what I'll call my first "real" mountain bike ride of the season.

    I had one ride a while ago - I think I mentioned it here - that didn't feel "real" because I was approaching it with a "let's test out my knee and my head" mindset. Also my drivetrain was ghost shifting like crazy. When I got to where the trail starts getting more technical, I turned around.

    A week after that, I cleaned the drivetrain and rode on a simple dirt road. My drivetrain was still jumping all over the place, shifting with almost no load. I took it to my LBS. I am honestly not sure when it last had any maintenance, but it had been sitting idle for 1.5 years (shoulder bursitis in the fall of 2015, then ACL in the spring of 2016 - I *may* have ridden it once or twice in between injuries - not sure). Sure enough, the middle rings of the cassette had worn down and needed to be replaced, which was what caused the jumping. I sprang for a pretty major work-over - all the usual stuff, plus fork and rear shock rebuild, bearing maintenance, new bottom bracket, brake bleed ...

    Anyway, I rode Springbrook on Sunday. Springbrook is a relatively new trail, just a few years old, and is a lovely addition to the Doughty Draw trail network. It's just over 2 miles for the loop, mellow climb, mellow descent, and you can ride it in either direction. It has just enough rocks to feel like you're riding a trail, while still being extremely approachable. I like to ride it clockwise, so that I'm climbing the somewhat rocky, shaded section of the trail, then descending on buff, swoopy singletrack. Granted, you have to be vigilant coming down because of some blind turns. The ride back down Doughty Draw to the trailhead is also fun and swoopy, with less chance of being blindsided.

    My knee-in-recovery (right) was a little cranky to start, but after some pedaling, it chilled out. My "reference knee" (left) was actually more troublesome. I went for a second loop, and that's when my left knee really started yowling. I *think* I recognize this sensation, and if it's what I think it is, a chiro can pop my lower leg bones back to where they belong.

    So, pedaling was just fine on my right knee. When I started, it seemed like my left leg was doing all of the work (at least, it's the one that felt sore), but that seemed to balance out over time. The trouble was with anything technical. My right knee wasn't interested in me standing up, let alone pedaling standing up, but this trail doesn't require any of that, anyway. But generally I love descending, and while I'm not the most disciplined about hovering with my pedals at 3 and 9, I am pretty good about adjusting my body off the saddle for rocks and such. Unfortunately, my right knee made the 3/9 position untenable, and it seemed like it took extra time and will power to switch body positions. So I found myself going "up" instead of "back" for the small drops, which of course made me feel like I was going to fly off the bike. Definitely not doing any fast descents until I clear that up.

    Good news, I had a couple of "moments" where I had to stop abruptly. My right knee never complained, and my brain isn't blocking anything there. I am experiencing no hesitation, subconscious or otherwise, about putting my foot down when it needs to happen. I had expected more resistance.

    Today, my left knee is still doing that thing - I plan to see a chiro after work - and my right knee has gotten cranky, particularly around the lower attachment point. That's pretty common after a new, or intensified, activity.

    I am hesitant to share this picture, because ugh, but I'm among friends, right? Gotta start somewhere. Maybe it's a "before"?

    20170416_165428.jpg

    The girl who took the picture for me just started mountain biking last season, so I told her about the Trek Dirt Series. I've already signed up for the one in Park City this season.

    if, for some reason, you are interested in the gory details: https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/1681719624


    Oh, regarding converting to 1x - I verified that I never got to granny - never past third-from-granny. The bike just feels too wobbly without the torque. That's how I've felt on every mountain bike I've ever ridden. Granted, this was not a steep trail, but I don't think that would change my aversion to being in the granny gear and feeling wobbly. Is this a technique issue, or maybe simply a side effect of a slower cadence?
     
    Yo Momma, AmyPJ and Ron like this.
  9. Ron

    Ron AKA Finndog Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Posts:
    3,240
    Location:
    Steamboat Springs, Co
    @Monique good job! :thumb:

    It's your first ride so don't worry too much about that knee. And, yes the lower attachment point on my knee was the last to fully heal up and was often achy but I was told to pretty much ignore it unless it became sharp deep pain. Ymmv of course.

    Spinning in the granny gear will tend to make you feel a little less stable especially given you speed of your pedaling vs the Forward moving speed of the bike. Spinning tends to slow your bike forward progress down to a point where your balance becomes much more in play as opposed to having more force on the pedals creating a more stable ptatform to create forward momentum and a easier platform to balance on. Does that make sense?

    Spinning fast makes you wobble more at slower speeds vs moving faster creating better balance through momentum
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2017
  10. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    6,759
    Location:
    Colorado
    That's what my doc said, too. It worries me, but I'm guessing it's not so much pulling on the graft as ... I don't know, something else that isn't as scary?

    Yes. Given that I've been riding a while (off and on, injury permitting), I tend to think that I'm not going to get to the point where I'm comfortable dropping that low. Do you think this is more preference, skill, or innate balance ability?


    Funny - my wheels look so small now that I'm used to seeing everyone else's 27.5 and 29er bikes.
     
  11. Ron

    Ron AKA Finndog Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Posts:
    3,240
    Location:
    Steamboat Springs, Co
    mostly its just the screw settling in.
    granny, i learned that when going over challenging terrain; rocks, roots or even punchy steep switchbacks, if you are too low, you can't keep enough momentum going froward (which helps with balance) and there's not enough resistance on the pedals to balance on/against . try working using a slightly (maybe 1 or 2 gears more resistance ) in those circumstances.
     
  12. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    6,759
    Location:
    Colorado
    Right. I always do that. Sounds like that's just fine. It further pushes me toward wanting that 1x drive train, since I don't use, those gears anyway!
     
  13. Ron

    Ron AKA Finndog Pugski Ski Tester

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    Posts:
    3,240
    Location:
    Steamboat Springs, Co
    yeah, its fine, the true test is if you can keep pedaling and not fall over! If you are clearing the obstacle/zone, then good job!
     
    Monique likes this.
  14. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    6,759
    Location:
    Colorado
    I plan to pick up some skills at the Dirt Series this summer!
     
  15. coskigirl

    coskigirl Out on the slopes Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    1,474
    Location:
    Lafayette, CO
    The Springbrook trail is one I've been running for nearly 8 years now. Love it for running and it's on my radar for mountain biking as well. Nice job on getting it done. I'm a bit nervous about some of the sections of the climb up to the loop from the Dowdy Draw trailhead. Although, I think your elevation numbers are a bit off, I know that doesn't start at 9500 feet.
     
    Monique likes this.
  16. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    6,759
    Location:
    Colorado
    Hah! That is more than slightly off. I noticed it was off by about 1k when I was skiing at Breck, too. Weird. I should look into that ...

    The thing about mountain biking is that you absolutely do not have to ride everything. So - unsolicited advice warning - if some of those sections intimidate you, you can walk them. One day you may find them approachable.

    I did notice - there's a section I've mostly had to walk along that section, and yesterday I was able to ride it. It was a section that "sucked" you into one direction visually, when another direction would put you on a better line to make it past the next rock. I wonder if they rearranged the rocks a bit.
     
  17. Josh Matta

    Josh Matta Out on the slopes Instructor

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Posts:
    1,561
    losing weight is meaningless if you end up riding slower.....
     
  18. BLT

    BLT BethL Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    16
    Location:
    Colorado
    Walking is definitely okay on a mountain bike. :) I have to walk some of the dowdy draw rocky section - the part from the very top down to the creek crossing (where they put in the new bridge). The rest of the loop is great. I also really like the springbrook loop - both for mountain biking and running.

    Speaking of lower gears on a mountain bike. I'm also not that comfortable going super slow in my lowest gear. I get worried that I'll fall over. My kids (ages 9 and 12) do not seem to have a problem with it at all. They can go really slow and not be concerned about it at all. In their biking groups, they work on skills related to going slow and maintaining balance (not putting a foot down). I think this is all technique stuff that's harder to get as we get older. Same with skiing bumps! :)
     
  19. Josh Matta

    Josh Matta Out on the slopes Instructor

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Posts:
    1,561
    slow gear at high cadence is hard....its much much harder on flat pedals. Anything technique should get easier as you get older if you do not make excuses, Balls,fitness, and flexibility . anyone can and should learn how to track stand before riding anything beyond the easiest of singletrack.
     
  20. BLT

    BLT BethL Skier

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Posts:
    16
    Location:
    Colorado
    That's what I need to work on this spring/summer.
     

Share This Page


We respect your privacy. your information is safe and will never be shared