Where to go from here...

Discussion in 'Ski School' started by Deadslow, Apr 11, 2017.

  1. slowrider

    slowrider Out on the slopes Skier

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    Ok why more dynamic movements? You need to find your limits before you can refine them. Most skiers do not move enough. He has a weak inside ski engagement. He doesn't counter enough, to give him more ROM.
     
  2. Jilly

    Jilly Lead Cougar Skier

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    Not sure how many that have responded are trained observers. Whether they are CSIA or PSIA, we are trained to see those "little" things. And all of those "little things" that we see will help you to improve.
     
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  3. markojp

    markojp mtn rep for the gear on my feet Industry Insider Instructor

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    Movements need to match forces. I think what you might be saying is to up the intensity by trying to ski the slow line faster. I wouldn't disagree with that as a means to open the 'what's next?' door. More than a couple here have suggested gates. I'm pushing back against the 'more angulation, more dynamic' because I see a lot of not very effective 'tech' skiing by folks trying really hard to create angles, dynamic turns, etc... relying on internal movements that far exceed external forces. Here's a great short clip of Ted free skiing at lower intensity levels. Lesser skiing? Nope. You've suggested to the OP the 'what', but what about the 'how'? Telling someone to 'angulate more' isn't likely to change someone's skiing much. Do we see huge amounts of angulation in the clip below? Nope. Do we see inclination above and angulation after apex? Yep. Why? Inclination gets the ski on edge early as the CoM gets ahear of the feet and pressure to the forebody of the ski in the intended direction of travel. Angulation allows him to move his CoM across the skis more readily because they're closer in relation to each other while managing centripetal forces on the outside ski... we're talking a lot of D.I.R.T. in addition to a couple of skill fundimentals here, which is something the OP's going to run into head first with the suggested value added intensity. .... all said for constructive conversation, not for starting a pissing match.
    :beercheer:

     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2017
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  4. markojp

    markojp mtn rep for the gear on my feet Industry Insider Instructor

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    And this one:



    A little more intensity, bigger angles, but nothing forced.... when the dirt is right and effort commensurate to the forces, you get the sensation of effortless flow.
     
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  5. Deadslow

    Deadslow Booting up Skier

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    Sebastien Michel is an incredible skier ...... some day (sigh).
     
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  6. skifastDDS

    skifastDDS AKA doublediamond223 Skier

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    Too much weight on the inside ski, you are using it as a crutch. Needs more counteracting at apex through to release. Too much up move in the releases. Good tipping movements with the feet, I would focus on strict outside ski balance in all turns. However, when transitions are fully extended very little foot tipping can occur. Phantom drags [tip down] and phantom javelins can help with the balance issue. This skiing looks very similar to mine a few years ago, and I have worked through many of these same issues. I'm sure you can ski all over the mountain just fine right now, but further refinements will allow you to experience much more ski performance.
     

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