In-depth series on skier deaths in Colorado

Discussion in 'General Skiing' started by SBrown, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. Lorenzzo

    Lorenzzo Snow Skier Skier

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    1,263
    Location:
    Park City, UT
    No that's no good. You're going to have to fall into a hole at A-Basin.
     
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  2. Monique

    Monique bounceswoosh Skier

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    Colorado
    Hmm. Not this season, okay?
     
  3. cantunamunch

    cantunamunch Head First Skier

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    Hey, get with the program, do you really want him to miss all those filing deadlines? :P
     
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  4. Lorenzzo

    Lorenzzo Snow Skier Skier

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    Park City, UT
    And I thought this was a community. See Eggshell Skull. She's the ideal complainant.
     
  5. TahoeCharlie

    TahoeCharlie RetroMan Skier

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    Location:
    Lake Tahoe, Crystal Bay. NV
    Totally agree with your second paragraph. In Europe, if you are going to venture away from the visible bowls, slopes and pistes, then you hire a guide for the day. As for the first, I guess you could call it an "uncontrolled area" if you skied off the single piste coming down from most chairs; but that's like calling Siberia Bowl "uncontrolled" if you traverse over under the Palisades or you traverse from Shirley into the Funnel as those areas are never groomed. The vast majority of slopes in Europe are NOT groomed; your just ski them - Sort of like lift-accessed "backcountry" skiing.

    Here is an example from Courchevel, first pict: the entire slope is skiable; 2nd: notice trail signs.

    IMGP0192.JPG IMGP0169.JPG
     
  6. François Pugh

    François Pugh Booting up Skier

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    Location:
    Great White North (Eastern side currently)
    It is quite different in areas where they get a lot of snow and you can ski on and off the marked trail without problem. In a lot of places in my part of the country, the snow on the trail gets packed down by the groomer, and although the snow may be level with that beside the trail, it is a lot harder. Skiing off the edge of such a trail causes your ski to sink, and you risk skiing under a submerged branch, or skiing back onto the trail your skis, a foot or so under the surface suddenly stop when they run into the hard snow and you don't (been there done that).

    When I read these stories about skier deaths, I think, "There, but for the grace of God go I." I enjoy the thrill of speed, and although I'm not usually trying to ski faster, I'm not usually concerned with trying to ski any slower either; I try to make perfectly clean carved arc-2-arc turns with as much g-force. When I was a younger man and spent more time skiing steeper longer terrain I was definitely one of those skiers who would seek an adrenaline rush by skiing as fast as they could. Back in the days when I was a speed seeking skier, I would ski all the runs including the moguls at a resort just to say I had skied them and so I would know every run, but I would then choose the best available run or line to maximize my speed. All other things being equal, I would choose a smoother run than a mogul run. But if the only way to reach max speed had a section of moguls on it, I would ski that line, making up for lack of skill with strength and athletic ability. The reason the mogul runs are devoid of high speed skiers are that these skiers now have a better option.

    Yes, the moguls will usually cause a beginner to fall before they reach warp speed, but if you look at the stats, it's typically an expert skier skiing fast, losing control and ending up hitting a tree. Removing all the groomed runs will not stop the 20-40 year old expert skier from skiing too fast, loosing control and smacking a tree.

    I do not want to see groomed steep runs disappear; I still enjoy them, even though I now enjoy slow skiing in moguls too.

    Skiing is a risky sport, and people easily become oblivious to the risk. Having skied hundreds of days at 50+ mph, it can seem very safe until something happens and your internal speedometer gets re-calibrated. I'm all in favour of reminding folks that, yeah, they could die doing this.
     

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